Noticias em eLiteracias

🔒
✇ Exposições - Google News

“Entre copos e balões”: nova Exposição do Espaço Cidadão - SAPO

17 de Fevereiro de 2024, 13:22
“Entre copos e balões”: nova Exposição do Espaço Cidadão  SAPO
✇ Exposições - Google News

Aveiro 2024: exposição criada por José Maçãs de Carvalho sobre o sal inaugurada esta sexta-feira - SAPO

17 de Fevereiro de 2024, 01:58
Aveiro 2024: exposição criada por José Maçãs de Carvalho sobre o sal inaugurada esta sexta-feira  SAPO
✇ Exposições - Google News

Natureza morta ou morte da natureza Exposição de Gravura e Azulejo de Conceição Freitas e alunos - e-cultura

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 20:04
Natureza morta ou morte da natureza Exposição de Gravura e Azulejo de Conceição Freitas e alunos  e-cultura
✇ Exposições - Google News

Mina de sal-gema de Loulé vai ter galeria adaptada para exposições temporárias - A voz do Algarve

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 16:15
Mina de sal-gema de Loulé vai ter galeria adaptada para exposições temporárias  A voz do Algarve
✇ Exposições - Google News

MauríciaS abre ciclo de exposições do hotel portuense Torel Avantgarde - Jornal de Notícias

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 16:02
MauríciaS abre ciclo de exposições do hotel portuense Torel Avantgarde  Jornal de Notícias
✇ Exposições - Google News

Concertos, comédia e exposições: 11 ideias para aproveitar a semana em Almada - Almadense

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 13:32
Concertos, comédia e exposições: 11 ideias para aproveitar a semana em Almada  Almadense
✇ Exposições - Google News

Falta uma exposição na sua agenda cultural? Há duas a decorrer e estão nos últimos dias - SAPO

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 13:18
Falta uma exposição na sua agenda cultural? Há duas a decorrer e estão nos últimos dias  SAPO
✇ Exposições - Google News

Torel Avantgarde lança ciclo de exposições Avant'Arte - SAPO

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 12:17
Torel Avantgarde lança ciclo de exposições Avant'Arte  SAPO
✇ Exposições - Google News

Ípsilon - Público

16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:31
Ípsilon  Público
✇ Open Culture

Architect Breaks Down the Design Of Four Iconic New York City Museums: the Met, MoMA, Guggenheim & Frick

Por Colin Marshall — 16 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:00

Context may not count for everything in art. But as underscored by everyone from Marcel Duchamp (or Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven) to the journalists who occasionally convince virtuoso musicians to busk in dingy public spaces, it certainly counts for something. Whether or not you believe that works of art retain the same essential value no matter where they’re beheld, some environments are surely more conducive to appreciation than others. The question of just which design elements make the difference has occupied museum architects for centuries, and in New York City alone, you can directly experience more than 200 years of bold exercises and experiments in the form.

In the Architectural Digest video above, architect Michael Wyetzner (previously featured here on Open Culture for his exegeses of New York’s apartments, bridges, and subway stations, as well as Central Park and the Chrysler Building) uses his expert knowledge to reveal the design choices that have gone into the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Frick Collection. No two of these famous art institutions were conceived in quite the same period, none look or feel quite the same as the others, and we can be reasonably sure that no single piece of art would look quite the same if it were moved between any of them.

Occupying five blocks of Central Park, MoMA is less a building than a collection of buildings — each added at a different time, in a style of that time — and indeed, less a collection of buildings than “a city unto itself,” as Wyetzner puts it.  (No wonder Claudia and Jamie Kincaid could run away from home and go unnoticed living in it.) The comparatively modest MoMA has also grown addition-by-addition, beginning with a “stripped-down form of modernism” that stood well out on the West 53rd street of the late thirties. It opened as the first of the many “clean white boxes” that would appear across the country — and later the world — to show the art of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

The original MoMA building remains striking today, but it’s now flanked by expansions from the hands of Philip Johnson, Cesar Pelli, Yoshio Taniguchi, and Jean Nouvel. Much less likely to have anything attached to it is the Guggenheim, with its instantly recognizable spiral design by Frank Lloyd Wright. Based on an idea by Le Corbusier, its narrow atrium-wrapping galleries do present certain difficulties for the proper display of large-scale artworks. Wyetzner also mentions the oft-heard criticism of Wright’s having “created a monument to himself — but it’s one hell of a monument.”

Last comes “the original building for the Whitney Museum of American Art, which later became the Met Breuer, which now has become the Frick. Who knows what it’ll become next.” The second of its names refers to its architect, the Bauhaus-trained Marcel Breuer (he of the Wassily chair), whose muscular design “slices off” the museum from the brownstone neighborhood that surrounds it. With its “open, loft-like spaces,” it provides a context meant for the art of its time, much as the Met, MoMA, and the Guggenheim do for the art of theirs. But all these institutions have succeeded just as much by carving out contexts of their own in the open-air museum of architecture and urbanism that is New York City.

Related content:

Architect Breaks Down Five of the Most Iconic New York City Apartments

The 5 Innovative Bridges That Make New York City, New York City

How Central Park Was Created Entirely By Design & Not By Nature: An Architect Breaks Down America’s Greatest Urban Park

An Architect Breaks Down the Design of New York City Subway Stations, from the Oldest to Newest

A Whirlwind Architectural Tour of the New York Public Library — “Hidden Details” and All

A 3D Animation Shows the Evolution of New York City (1524 — 2023)

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities, language, and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter Books on Cities, the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

✇ Exposições - Google News

Exposições: A pintura de Teresa Murta tem imagens que se afogam - Expresso

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 22:57
Exposições: A pintura de Teresa Murta tem imagens que se afogam  Expresso
✇ Exposições - Google News

Exposições: O azulejo de um alemão em Portugal - Expresso

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 22:57
Exposições: O azulejo de um alemão em Portugal  Expresso
✇ Exposições - Google News

Exposição "Mergulho Cego", de Maria Fradinho, na Galeria Municipal de Torres Vedras - SAPO

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 15:00
Exposição "Mergulho Cego", de Maria Fradinho, na Galeria Municipal de Torres Vedras  SAPO
✇ Exposições - Google News

Atenção, artistas: já se podem candidatar ao projeto Armazém 56 - New in Seixal

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 13:47
Atenção, artistas: já se podem candidatar ao projeto Armazém 56  New in Seixal
✇ Exposições - Google News

Caparica | A Liberdade está a Passar por Aqui - Almada online

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 12:46
Caparica | A Liberdade está a Passar por Aqui  Almada online
✇ Open Culture

The $25,000 Turntable Designed by Brian Eno That Glows in Different Colors as It Plays

Por Colin Marshall — 15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:00

When we think of Brian Eno’s work, we first think of his records. These include not just his own classics of “ambient music” — a term he popularized — like Discreet Music and Music for Airports, but also the albums he’s produced: Devo’s Q. Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!, Talking Heads’ Remain in Light, U2’s The Joshua Tree, David Bowie’s Outside. Yet even before he got into music, Eno was painting, and in some sense, he’s never stopped. He was describing his work with sound as the creation of “imaginary landscapes” even in the nineteen-eighties; in this century, he’s continued to put out records while creating ever-more-high-profile works of a more visual nature, from installations to apps.

A few years ago, Eno even got into the business of functional sculpture, designing a turntable that emanates LED light of various, gradually shifting colors while it plays records. “The light from it was tangible as if caught in a cloud of vapor,” said Eno about his early experience with the finished product, quoted at designboom upon the announcement of its limited production run in 2021.

“We sat watching for ages, transfixed by this totally new experience of light as a physical presence.” Now comes the sequel, Eno’s Turntable II, which will be produced in equally restricted numbers.  “Those who can afford one of the 150 limited units also receive the musician’s signature and edition number engraved on the side of the neon turntable’s base,” says designboom.

Eno’s turntable design recently drew attention as the inspiration for U2’s stage set during their residency at Las Vegas’ brazen new venue The Sphere. In the home, it serves multiple functions: “When it doesn’t have to do anything in particular, like play a record, it is a sculpture,” Eno says, “and when it’s in action, it’s a generative artwork. Several overlapping light cycles will keep producing different color balances and blends — and different shadow formations that slowly evolve and never exactly repeat.” Die-hard fans who know how long Eno has been following this artistic and intellectual thread may consider Turntable II’s £20,000 (or more than $25,000 USD) price tag almost reasonable. And next to the $60,000 Linn Sondek LP12 Jony Ive redesigned last year, it’s practically a bargain.

Related content:

Brian Eno Explains the Origins of Ambient Music

Watch Brian Eno’s “Video Paintings,” Where 1980s TV Technology Meets Visual Art

Brian Eno on Creating Music and Art As Imaginary Landscapes (1989)

Brian Eno Shares His Critical Take on Art & NFTs: “I Mainly See Hustlers Looking for Suckers”

World Records: New Photo Exhibit Pays Tribute to the Era of Vinyl Records & Turntables

Pizza Box Becomes a Playable DJ Turntable Through the Magic of Conductive Ink

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities, language, and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter Books on Cities, the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

✇ Open Culture

Punk Dulcimer: Hear The Ramones’ “I Wanna Be Sedated” Played on the Dulcimer

Por OC — 15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 09:00

Sam Edelston can rock the duclimer. On his YouTube channel, he writes: “Dulcimers are natural rock instruments. In fact, I even say that dulcimers are among the world’s coolest musical instruments, and they deserve to be known by the general public — the way that everybody knows guitars and ukuleles. Though usually associated with old folk songs and tunes, dulcimers are great for a shocking variety of modern music, too. I do these videos to inspire more people to play and listen to dulcimer music, in diverse, non-traditional styles.” Above, watch him cover the Ramones’ 1978 classic “I Wanna Be Sedated.” Find more covers of  Zeppelin, the Stones & Beatles here. And yet more covers–including Bowie’s “Space Oddity” and Sabbath’s “War Pigs”–on the Contemporary Dulcimer YouTube Channel. Enjoy.

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newsletter, please find it here. Or follow our posts on Threads, Facebook, BlueSky or Mastodon.

If you would like to support the mission of Open Culture, consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. You can contribute through PayPal, Patreon, and Venmo (@openculture). Thanks!

Related Content:

Finnish Musicians Play Bluegrass Versions of AC/DC, Iron Maiden & Ronnie James Dio

Tears for Fears Sings “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” with Musician Who Created Divine Dulcimer Version of Their Song

A Bluegrass Version of Metallica’s Heavy Metal Hit, “Enter Sandman”

Pakistani Musicians Play Amazing Version of Dave Brubeck’s Jazz Classic, “Take Five”

Watch Jimi Hendrix’s ‘Voodoo Chile’ Performed on a Gayageum, a Traditional Korean Instrument

✇ Exposições - Google News

ENSINO - Comemorações dos 50 anos da UMinho incluem cortejo nas ruas de Braga, concertos e exposições - OAmarense

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 08:36
ENSINO - Comemorações dos 50 anos da UMinho incluem cortejo nas ruas de Braga, concertos e exposições  OAmarense
✇ Exposições - Google News

Tomar | Ciclo 'Fotografia e Território' com três exposições em 2024 - mediotejo.net

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 08:30
Tomar | Ciclo 'Fotografia e Território' com três exposições em 2024  mediotejo.net
✇ Exposições - Google News

Estas são as exposições em Lisboa para ver este fim-de-semana - Time Out Lisboa

15 de Fevereiro de 2024, 00:00
Estas são as exposições em Lisboa para ver este fim-de-semana  Time Out Lisboa
✇ Exposições - Google News

Gondomar promove primeiro festival dedicado ao mundo animal - - Jornal Novo Regional

14 de Fevereiro de 2024, 15:16
Gondomar promove primeiro festival dedicado ao mundo animal -  Jornal Novo Regional
✇ Open Culture

A 3D Animation Shows the Evolution of New York City (1524 — 2023)

Por Colin Marshall — 14 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:00

Nearly two and a half centuries after its founding, the United States of America is still both celebrated and derided as a young country. Examined on the whole, the US may or may not seem less mature than other lands in any obvious way, but the difference manifests much more clearly on the level of cities. For even among those founded before the independence of the country itself, no American city has yet attained 500 official years of age. But in the case of New York City, we can trace its formation through half a millennium of history, as rendered in the 3D animated video from InfoGeek above.

The long version of New York’s story begins in 1524, the year Giovanni da Verrazzano commanded the French ship La Dauphine into what we now know as New York Harbor. While he and his crew did not, of course, get the dramatic forest-of-skyscrapers view for which that approach would later be celebrated, they would, perhaps, have seen an actual forest, as well as other elements of a natural landscape that would have appeared sublimely untouched. A century later, the Dutch there founded the trading outpost of New Amsterdam, which commenced the written history of New York — as well as the aggressive development that would eventually come to characterize the city and its culture.

New Amsterdam became New York in 1664, one of the many historical events that scroll past in the window at the video’s lower-left corner. At that point in time, the population had grown to about 3,600, a figure counted at the bottom of the frame. Yet even as we see streets roll out, buildings rise, and trees sprout rapidly around us over the next 150 or so years of our stroll, and even after New York becomes America’s largest city in 1790, we must bear in mind that its century hasn’t even begun. It’s something of an irony that the hugely destructive Great Fire of 1835 precedes a developmental push that makes the city, even to our twenty-first-century eyes, look almost modern.

Later in the nineteenth century, we witness the appearance of Central Park and the introduction of motorcars; by the turn of the twentieth, New York’s population approaches three and a half million. Walking down Wall Street (and into the Great Depression), we pass just-materializing landmarks that remain iconic today, like the Chrysler Building, the Empire State Building and — after a somewhat dramatic fast-forward in time — Frank Lloyd Wright’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Minoru Yamasaki’s ill-fated World Trade Center. We’re now well into the New York of living memory, and even when the animation has passed the creative decrepitude of the seventies and eighties and arrives at the city as it was last year (population: 7,888,120), we sense that its evolution has only just begun.

Related content:

New York City: A Social History (A Free Online Course from N.Y.U.)

Immaculately Restored Film Lets You Revisit Life in New York City in 1911

Scenes of New York City in 1945 Colorized & Revived with Artificial Intelligence

The Lost Neighborhood Buried Under New York City’s Central Park

How Central Park Was Created Entirely By Design & Not By Nature: An Architect Breaks Down America’s Greatest Urban Park

An Architect Demystifies the Art Deco Design of the Iconic Chrysler Building (1930)

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities, language, and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter Books on Cities, the book The Stateless City: a Walk through 21st-Century Los Angeles and the video series The City in Cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

✇ Open Culture

The Cover of George Orwell’s 1984 Becomes Less Censored with Wear & Tear

Por OC — 14 de Fevereiro de 2024, 09:00

1984 before

In 2013, Penguin released in the UK a series of new covers for five works by George Orwell, including a particularly bold cover design for Orwell’s best-known work, 1984. According to Creative Review, the designer, David Pearson, made it so that the book’s title and Orwell’s name were debossed, then almost completely obscured by black foiling, leaving just “enough of a dent for the title to be determined.” No doubt, the design plays on the whole idea of censorship, “referencing the rewriting of history carried out by the novel’s Ministry of Truth.”

Years later, you’ll have difficulty buying new copies of Pearson’s design. They’re in pretty short supply. But anyone with a well-worn copy of the book might discover what one Redditor has also observed–that the cover design “becomes less censored with wear.” Compare the “before” image above to the “after” image down below. Was this all part of Pearson’s long-range master plan? Or something of a design flaw? We’ll probably never know. But if you’re looking for a book that gets better with age, then this is one to add to your list.

1984 after

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newsletter, please find it here. Or follow our posts on Threads, Facebook, BlueSky or Mastodon.

If you would like to support the mission of Open Culture, consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. You can contribute through PayPal, Patreon, and Venmo (@openculture). Thanks!

Related Content:

Hear the Very First Adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984 in a Radio Play Starring David Niven (1949)

Free Download: A Knitting Pattern for a Sweater Depicting an Iconic Cover of George Orwell’s 1984

George Orwell’s Harrowing Race to Finish 1984 Before His Death

Aldous Huxley to George Orwell: My Hellish Vision of the Future is Better Than Yours (1949)

✇ Exposições - Google News

O polémico restauro de Souto de Moura no Mosteiro de Alcobaça: a lição do claustro - Expresso

13 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:00
O polémico restauro de Souto de Moura no Mosteiro de Alcobaça: a lição do claustro  Expresso
✇ Open Culture

10 Biggest Threats to the World in 2024, Ranked by Ian Bremmer

Por OC — 13 de Fevereiro de 2024, 10:00

At the start of each year, Ian Bremmer, a political scientist and president of Eurasia Group, creates a list that ranks the greatest threats to our world. In 2024, Bremmer puts his finger on Ungoverned AI, a Partitioned Ukraine, a volatile Middle East, and a sputtering Chinese economy. But the biggest threat? A divided United States where the right and left consider each other an existential threat, where political candidates threaten their rivals, where power doesn’t get transitioned peacefully, and where foreign nations look to further sow the seeds of internal division. You can read Bremmer’s full report here.

If you would like to sign up for Open Culture’s free email newsletter, please find it here. Or follow our posts on Threads, Facebook, BlueSky or Mastodon.

If you would like to support the mission of Open Culture, consider making a donation to our site. It’s hard to rely 100% on ads, and your contributions will help us continue providing the best free cultural and educational materials to learners everywhere. You can contribute through PayPal, Patreon, and Venmo (@openculture). Thanks!

 

 

❌