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Antes de ontemHealth Information & Libraries Journal

General practitioners' wellbeing during the COVID‐19 pandemic: Novel methods with social media data

Por Su Golder, Laura Jefferson, Elizabeth McHugh, Holly Essex, Claire Heathcote, Ana Castro Avila, Veronica Dale, Christina Van Der Feltz‐Cornelis, Karen Bloor

Abstract

Background

It is difficult to engage busy healthcare professionals in research. Yet during the COVID-19 pandemic, gaining their perspectives has never been more important.

Objective

To explore social media data for insights into the wellbeing of UK General Practitioners (GPs) during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Methods

We used a combination of search approaches to identify 381 practising UK NHS GPs on Twitter. Using a two stage social media analysis, we firstly searched for key themes from 91,034 retrieved tweets (before and during the pandemic). Following this we used qualitative content analysis to provide in-depth insights from 7145 tweets related to wellbeing.

Results

Social media proved a useful tool to identify a cohort of UK GPs; following their tweets longitudinally to explore key themes and trends in issues related to GP wellbeing during the pandemic. These predominately related to support, resources and public perceptions and fluctuations were identified at key timepoints during the pandemic, all achieved without burdening busy GPs.

Conclusion

Social media data can be searched to identify a cohort of GPs to explore their wellbeing and changes over time.

Forthcoming Papers

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 4, Page 402-403, December 2022.

In this issue…

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 4, Page 310-311, December 2022.

Issue Information Covers

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 4, Page i-iv, December 2022.

Finding and evaluating randomised controlled trials in nursing conducted by Spanish research teams: A scoping review

Por Melixa Medina‐Aedo, Elena Torralba‐Martinez, Cristian Segura‐Carrillo, Diana Buitrago‐García, Ivan Solà, Héctor Pardo‐Hernández, Xavier Bonfill

Abstract

Background/objectives

To identify and assess the main characteristics and the potential risk of bias of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in nursing conducted by Spanish research teams.

Methods

Scoping review of an electronic search in three major databases (date of search: October 2021). For the eligible studies, both descriptive data, and data to assess the potential risk of bias, were collected and analysed.

Results

Of 3391 references retrieved, 199 were eligible. These RCTs were published in 122 journals, most of them in English (101, 82.1%) and were included in the Journal Citation Report (JCR) (107, 87.7%). Moreover, 32 (26.2%) of those included in the JCR were classified under nursing. Two thirds (81, 66.4%) of the journals followed the CONSORT guidelines. A total of 65 RCTs (33.7%) had a high overall risk of bias.

Discussion

Most of the identified RCTs were published in journals not specific to nursing and in English language. Also, shortcomings in RCT design and reporting were observed despite recommendations to adhere the CONSORT guidelines.

Conclusion

Comprehensive identification of RCTs in nursing may require searching in journals other than nursing-related. RCTs from Spanish research teams are more likely to be published in international journals published in English. CONSORT should be strongly advised to encourage proper design and reporting of RCTs.

Acknowledgements

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 4, Page 400-401, December 2022.

Bibliometric analysis of COVID‐19 publications shows the importance of telemedicine and equitable access to the internet during the pandemic and beyond

Por Mahnaz Samadbeik, Peivand Bastani, Farhad Fatehi

Abstract

Background

Pandemics highlight the increasing role of information and communications technology for improving access to health care. This study aimed to present a bibliometric analysis of the concept of digital divide reported in the published articles concerning the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Methods

To conduct this bibliometric analysis of research topics and trends, we used VOSviewer software. We developed a search strategy to retrieve peer-reviewed publications related to ‘digital divide in the COVID-19 era' from the Scopus database.

Results

In total, 241 publications on the topic of digital divide and COVID-19 were retrieved from Scopus database between 2020 and 2021. The analysis of keywords co-occurrence of research topics revealed four main clusters including: ‘telemedicine’, ‘Internet access and Internet use’, ‘e-learning’ and ‘epidemiology’. Seven characteristic categories were examined in these research topics, including: sociodemographic, economic, social, cultural, personal, material and motivational.

Conclusion

‘Telemedicine’ and ‘Internet access and Internet use’ as the largest clusters are connected to topics addressing inequalities in online health care access. Thus, policymakers should develop or modify policies in more egalitarian Internet access for all community members not only during a pandemic like the COVID-19 but also at regular times.

Celebrating 75 years of the Health Libraries Group

Por Maria J. Grant

Abstract

To mark the CILIP Health Libraries Group celebrations of their 75th anniversary, this year's Virtual Issue brings together Health Information and Libraries Journal manuscripts that have been particularly influential or generated most interest in our readers, or represent a significant event in the journal's own history, while still having relevance to contemporary health library and knowledge service practice.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence information specialist development pathway: Developing the skills, knowledge and confidence to quality assure search strategies

Por Paul Levay, Nicola Walsh, Louise Foster

Abstract

Quality assurance (QA) is an important process in ensuring that systematic reviews and other evidence syntheses are supported by a high-quality search. This paper describes how the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK established a development pathway to ensure its information specialists had the skills, knowledge and confidence to undertake search QA. The key component of the pathway is that it blends technical knowledge with interpersonal skills. The pathway develops technical skills in the early steps before using peer support activities to build confidence while undertaking a range of searches. QA is effective when the search lead communicates the contextual information that has influenced search development. QA is treated as a collaboration to get the right search for the review. The key requirements for search QA, alongside technical knowledge, are communication, collaboration and negotiation skills.

Academic integrity among medical students and postgraduate trainees in the teaching hospitals of South Punjab Pakistan

Por Mehreen Azam, Salman Bin Naeem

Abstract

This study investigated the topic of the academic integrity among medical students and postgraduate trainees in the teaching hospitals of South Punjab, Pakistan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted involving 318 medical students and postgraduate trainees of teaching hospitals. The results found that medical students of pre-clinical years engaged in unethical behaviour, that is, exam cheating and plagiarism to cope with internal and external evaluation and the range of subjects needed to be studied. For postgraduate trainees, results showed trainees unintentionally engaged in the practice of plagiarism due to lack of understanding about what constitutes plagiarism, coupled with externally perceived pressures associated with expectations of research publication, promotions and tenured positions. To address these concerns, it is recommended that information literacy sessions for undergraduate and postgraduate medical students on plagiarism prevention and ethical practice be designed and facilitated by medical librarians in collaboration of faculty members.

Forthcoming papers

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 3, Page 304-305, September 2022.

Issue Information Covers

Health Information &Libraries Journal, Volume 39, Issue 3, Page i-iv, September 2022.

Transforming health science libraries around the globe: The impact of technology

Por Jeannette Murphy

Abstract

Health science libraries have been using information technology since the late 1960s, shaping both the profession and the mission of these libraries. To explore the impact of technology, a series of articles has been commissioned for the HILJ Regular Feature, International Perspectives and Initiatives. This editorial sets the scene for this series of articles, which starts in this issue. These articles, written by health science librarians from around the globe, will explore the impact of technology on the way health science libraries provide information in the digital age. Some articles will look at national trends and others will focus on a particular library. A key theme is how technology is being used to support the mission of health science libraries and whether technology has altered that mission. This editorial provides a brief overview of the technologies libraries have adopted, from the 1970s to the present day. From this, it is clear that information technology has transformed the way health information is collected, catalogued, and disseminated to users. And it is certain that in the coming decade new technologies will be incorporated into health science libraries, which will pose challenges for both users and librarians. However, librarians will continue to find ways to adapt and use these tools to meet the needs of their users.

NHS knowledge and library services in England in the digital age

Por Sue Lacey Bryant, Richard Bridgen, Emily Hopkins, Catherine McLaren, David Stewart

Abstract

National Health Service (NHS) knowledge and library services in England are integrating digital advances into their systems and services. Health Education England (HEE) leads on the development of NHS library services. A key workstream focuses on (1) improving the infrastructure to enable discovery and management of digital knowledge resources; (2) collaborating with local teams to establish regional library management systems that are integrated with the new national discovery service for healthcare staff and learners. This article explores initiatives on resource discovery as well as the need for system-wide partnership working to ensure that biomedical knowledge in computable form is findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. Low levels of health and digital literacy pose a significant barrier to using health information and accessing health services. A range of interventions are aimed at enhancing citizens' digital and health literacy skills. The education and life-long learning needs of the knowledge and library services workforce are considered. Working with CILIP and higher education institutions, HEE delivers a range of educational offers through its Learning Academy. As Artificial Intelligence and automation are implemented in health systems, knowledge and library staff form a crucial bridge between technology and those who use it.

Infodemiology for oral health and disease: A scoping review

Por Radhika Gupta, Vikrant Mohanty, Aswini Y. Balappanavar, Puneet Chahar, Kavita Rijhwani, Sonal Bhatia

Abstract

Introduction

Increasing affordability, accessibility and penetration of internet services worldwide, have substantially changed the ways of gathering health-related information. This has led to the origin of concept infodemiology that allows the information to be collected and analysed in near real time. Globally, oral diseases affect nearly 3.5 billion people; thus, volume and profile of oral health searches would help in understanding specific community dental needs and formulation of pertinent oral health strategies.

Aim

To review the published literature on infodemiological aspects of oral health and disease.

Methodology

This scoping review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA-ScR guidelines. Electronic search engines (Google Scholar) and databases (PubMed, Web of science, Scopus) were searched from 2002 onwards.

Results

Thirty-eight articles were included in this review. The infodemiological studies for oral health and disease were mainly used in two domains. Out of 38 articles, 24 accessed the quality of available online information and 15 studied online oral health-related information seeking behaviour.

Conclusion

The most commonly searched oral diseases were toothache, oral cancer, dental caries, periodontal disease, oral maxillofacial surgical procedures and paediatric oral diseases. Most of the studies belonged to developed countries and Google was the most researched search engine.

Using the pet health information behaviour intervention model should make information prescriptions for pet guardians more effective

Por Niloofar Solhjoo

Abstract

Background

Studies on information behaviour related to companion animal's (pet) health have been carried out in different contexts and there have been attempts to modify and idealize these information behaviours.

Objective

The purpose of this study is to apply the Pet Health Information Behaviour Intervention model in an empirical context and elaborate the theoretical contribution of the model to information behaviour research in the context of pet care and management.

Methods

All the variables of the proposed model were quantified and tested through case study research involving 20 participants. Each case consisted of a guardian who participated in the information intervention program with their cat(s) and/or dog(s) in a small animal hospital, with a follow-up interview after 2 weeks.

Results

The information prescription helped both the experienced Internet searchers and the less health literate guardians. The pet guardians were particularly appreciative of the advice on evaluating and using online health information. The higher guardian-pet bond, the more the participant used the tips to search online information. The information prescription helped the relationship with the veterinary professional through improved data gathering and perception of the professional-guardian partnership.

Conclusion

The model will assist both information professionals and animal health providers to better design and evaluate information interventions that support pet welfare.

An evaluation of the quality of COVID‐19 websites in terms of HON principles and using DISCERN tool

Por Reza Safdari, Marsa Gholamzadeh, Soheila Saeedi, Mozhgan Tanhapour, Sorayya Rezayi

Abstract

Background

As many people relied on information from the Internet for official scientific or academically affiliated information during the COVID-19 pandemic, the quality of information on those websites should be good.

Objective

The main purpose of this study was to evaluate a selection of COVID-19-related websites for the quality of health information provided.

Method

Using Google and Yahoo, 36 English language websites were selected, in accordance with the inclusion criteria. The two tools were selected for evaluation were the Health on the Net (HON) Code and the 16-item DISCERN tool.

Results

Most websites (39%) were related to information for the public, and a small number of them (3%) concerned screening websites in which people could be informed of their possible condition by entering their symptoms. The result of the evaluation by the HON tool showed that most websites were reliable (53%), and 44% of them were very reliable. Based on the assessment results of the Likert-based 16-item DISCERN tool, the maximum and minimum values for the average scores of each website were calculated as 2.44 and 4.25, respectively.

Conclusion

Evaluation using two widely accepted tools shows that most websites related to COVID-19 are reliable and useful for physicians, researchers and the public.

Wanted! Health information students & early career health information workers new to writing for publication

Por Frances Johnson

Abstract

Invitation to health information students and early career health information workers new to writing for publication to share evaluations of existing services or investigations into service improvement.

Mental health‐related internet use by people with a diagnosis of chronic psychiatric disorder, attending community mental health centres

Por Abdurrahman Yakisir, Zekiye Cetinkaya Duman

Abstract

Background

There is little information on Internet use for obtaining mental health information among individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders, who are receiving services from community mental health centres (CMHCs).

Objective

To investigate the mental health information-seeking behaviour of individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders who attend CMHCs.

Method

This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. The data was collected by questionnaire (structured interview format) (n = 135 participants). The collected data were analysed with descriptive statistics and chi-square test.

Results

It was found that 75.6% of the participants used the internet to search for information about mental health problems. Although the information retrieved from the internet was frequently or occasionally shared with the mental health team (19.6% and 40.2% of the participants, respectively), general online communication with professionals was rare (93.1% of the participants had not contacted mental health professionals).

Conclusions

Most participants looked for information about their mental health on the internet. Therefore, mental health professionals should consider how to facilitate professional-patient therapeutic communication, with acknowledged Internet use by individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders.

Development and spread of health literacy eLearning: A partnership across Scotland and England

Por Ruth Carlyle, Annette Thain, Sally James

Abstract

With international health challenges, there are opportunities for collaboration between nations on health issues, including developing and sharing resources for teaching and learning. This article outlines collaboration across Scotland and England to develop a core resource for eLearning on health literacy. It describes the development of the resource with case studies of the implementation in Scotland and England, demonstrating the balance between shared development and tailored implementation. The eLearning was developed to increase awareness of NHS workforce and community partners, supplemented by training for NHS librarians and public health specialists to enable them to provide more tailored training on health literacy techniques.

NHS librarians collaborate to develop a search bank peer reviewing and sharing COVID‐19 searches: an evaluation

Por Hélène Gorring, Pip Divall, Sarah Gardner, Anne Gray, Alison McLaren, Lindsay Snell, Eva Thackeray, Adam Tocock, Gil Young

Abstract

Background

Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, Health Education England (HEE) mobilised a group of expert searchers from NHS libraries in England to develop a platform for librarians to share peer reviewed search strategies and results on the Knowledge for Healthcare website.

Objectives

(1) To document the origins of the COVID-19 search bank, (2) evaluate attitudes of NHS librarians in England towards the search bank and (3) identify lessons learned and consider whether the initiative might be developed further.

Methods

Structured interviews with the peer reviewers (n = 10) were conducted, and a questionnaire survey of the NHS library community using the search bank was undertaken.

Results

The interviews confirmed the value of collaboration. Expert searchers worked in pairs to peer review submitted search strategies. The survey (85 responses) indicated that a majority had used the search bank, and approved of the project, with some differences of opinion on functionality and future developments.

Discussion

Collaborative working for the search bank probably saved time for individual NHS librarians. The quality of the searches submitted was variable as were librarians' approaches to presentation and development of search strategies. Peer review benefits from a buddy approach among expert searchers and agreement about feedback provided to contributors.

Conclusion

Search strategies are the most useful element of a search bank. Peer review can be challenging and would benefit from a formal structure, but it is professionally rewarding.

Students' increased time spent on social media, and their level of coronavirus anxiety during the pandemic predict increased social media addiction

Por Hilal Parlak Sert, Hatice Başkale

Abstract

Background

During the COVID-19 pandemic period, the level of anxiety and the duration of social media use increased in university students.

Objectives

This study aimed to examine the relationship between coronavirus anxiety and social media addiction in university students.

Methods

The sample consisted of 346 university students in Turkey. The data were collected online using the Sociodemographic Data Form, the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale Short Form and the Social Network Addiction Scale. The data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, Mann–Whitney U test, Pearson correlation analysis, chi-square analysis and multiple linear regression analysis.

Results

The results showed that the mean coronavirus anxiety score was higher in men than in women. Social media addiction increased as the daily time spent by the students on social media increased. A positive correlation was found between the daily time spent on social media before the pandemic and social media usage during the pandemic. It was concluded that students use social media more during the pandemic than before it and that social media addiction increases as the students' coronavirus anxiety increases.

Conclusion

It is important to plan initiatives to reduce coronavirus anxiety to prevent social media addiction in young people.

Study Location and Sample

The research population consisted of 1st and 2nd year students who are studying in the Medical Services and Techniques Department of Vocational School of Health Services at a university located in the west of Turkey, during the Fall Term of academic year 2020–2021. Students in this department are studying in anaesthesia, dialysis, first and emergency aid, medical laboratory techniques, medical imaging technique, and medical documentation and secretarial programmes.

Landscape of health sciences librarian‐mediated search services

Por Danielle M. Westmark, Teresa L. Hartman, Cynthia M. Schmidt

Abstract

Background

Health librarians have traditionally provided mediated searches to support patient care, education and research.

Objectives

This study aims to discover the types of search result formats used by health science libraries, determine current practice among health science libraries (types of requesters served, fees, deduplication, turnaround time and citation manager use) and uncover innovative methods for providing search results.

Methods

An online survey was distributed to the MEDLIB-L, ExpertSearching, MidContinental Chapter of the Medical Library Association and ICON listservs and through direct email to selected Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries reference and education librarians.

Results

Librarians affiliated with 127 institutions from 11 countries (including the USS) and 36 USS states and territories responded. One hundred and forty-two of the total 150 analysed responses provided information on full-text access, and 81 of those 142 responses (57%) indicated that the institutions' link-resolver links were included in search results provided to the requester. The survey responses provide information on literature search services regarding turnaround time, use of a citation managers, fees and deduplication.

Conclusion

With the developing landscape of citation managers and the tools offered, these data can be used as a benchmark for librarians who are considering evaluating or modifying their search service delivery.

A 10‐year follow‐up survey of US academic libraries highlights the COVID‐19 experience and greater interest in health information outreach

Por Jodi Jameson, Lucy Duhon

Abstract

Background

As follow-up to their previous survey on health information outreach (HIO) in 2010, the authors became interested in the evolving nature of HIO activities at academic libraries within the past decade.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to understand how HIO activities at academic libraries have evolved since 2010, especially considering the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods

An online survey, designed to collect quantitative data on general HIO activities and qualitative data specifically on COVID-19 information outreach, was distributed to over 1700 librarians at US general academic and academic health science libraries.

Results

Two hundred and fifty-five respondents completed the survey. Quantitative findings generally paralleled the 2010 results, except in a few areas. Most notably, a greater percentage of librarians in 2020 were participating in HIO (44%) than in 2010 (37%). Qualitative findings revealed that librarians are leveraging traditional information services and implementing innovative partnerships to promote reputable health information resources on COVID-19.

Discussion

Evidence suggests that further engagement and campus partnerships can enhance libraries' supportive roles as trustworthy purveyors of quality health information.

Conclusion

US academic librarians are increasingly engaging in HIO to support the health information needs of campus communities and should consider aligning outreach activities with national health goals.

Community, Risk Assessment, Prevention and Control: Black American College Student's Information Seeking on COVID‐19

Por J. Brenton Stewart

Abstract

Background

Despite the disproportionate impact of the novel coronavirus on Black Americans, there is little research that centres Black college students' information behaviours during the pandemic.

Objective

The objective of this study is to identify information needs, resources and use regarding the novel coronavirus pandemic among Black American college students.

Methods

This is a quantitative study among 389 college students in the USA. Data were collected using an online crowdsourced survey instrument. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse data through SPSS.

Results

The most salient information needs related to Covid-19 symptoms, personal protective equipment, vulnerable populations, and risk assessment; however, students also wanted information on Covid-19's impact on the Black community. There were no statistically significant gender differences in students' information seeking, resources or use with one exception; male students believed the internet alone could provide all relevant information about the coronavirus in comparison to female students. Barriers related to the volume of information, information fluidity and determining the quality of information.

Conclusion

Colleges and universities can play a critical role in information dissemination during crisis events. Students need critical information literacy skills that intersect with everyday information needs, particularly health literacy.

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