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Antes de ontemHealth Information & Libraries Journal

Study of health information needs among adolescents in Croatia shows distinct gender differences in information seeking behaviour

Por Ivana Martinović, Sung Un Kim, Snježana Stanarević Katavić

Abstract

Background

Understanding the health information needs of adolescents is the first step towards providing them with relevant information to aid them in their decision making regarding health issues.

Objective

The goal of this study is to assess adolescents’ needs, perceptions and sources of health information.

Methods

Four hundred sixty-nine high school students in Osijek, Croatia, participated in this study by answering a questionnaire. The collected data were analysed using basic frequency and non-parametric statistical methods.

Results

The most popular health topics identified by adolescents in our study were nutrition, diseases, depression, relationships, sexual intercourse and alcohol. Adolescents consider their parents the most reliable personal source of health information (72.0%), while they perceive the Internet as the main non-personal source of health information (29.8%). Adolescents wish to get more education about health issues at school (54.4%). Significant gender differences were found in adolescents’ needs, perceptions and sources of health information.

Conclusions

It is important to provide adolescents with systematic institutional health education and improve health advisory services and library/information services to assist adolescents in locating health information and resolving their health related questions.

Regional and rural allied health professionals in Australia need better information services training and support for evidence‐based practice

Por Jacqueline Lienesch, Kylie Ann Murphy, Tracey Elizabeth Parnell, Adele Miles

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based practice requires health professionals to recognise situations of uncertainty in their practice, translate that uncertainty into answerable questions, and find and appraise information relevant to those questions. No research to date has explored the research-based information needs of allied health professionals (AHPs) in regional and rural Australia.

Objective

To examine the information-seeking experiences and needs of AHPs in regional and rural Australia.

Methods

A total of 80 AHPs, predominantly occupational therapists and physiotherapists, practising in regional and rural areas of Australia completed an online survey.

Results

Almost all respondents reported having questions requiring research evidence, but most of their questions were worded non-specifically. Respondents practising in rural areas had greater perceived difficulty in obtaining relevant evidence than their regional counterparts. Many respondents reported wanting additional support to find relevant research evidence.

Discussion

The findings offer insights regarding information-seeking challenges AHPs face and potential solutions, including improved training and increased health librarian support. However, due to sampling limitations, the results cannot be generalised to all allied health professions.

Conclusion

Allied health professionals may require more training and support to engage in efficient and effective information-seeking behaviours. Health librarians have a valuable role to play in providing this training and support.

Library and knowledge staff in England share similar perceptions of the roles and personal characteristics of the clinical librarian

Por Sarah Rudd, Sam Harding

Abstract

Introduction

Indications on the development of the health library and knowledge workforce (LKS) in England suggest that more staff may need to shift into clinical librarian (CL) roles. Anecdotal evidence suggested that CL roles have changed recently.

Objectives

To examine perceptions of CL tasks and required personal characteristics of CLs, amongst both practising CLs and other LKS staff in England.

Methods

An online survey was followed by descriptive statistical and content analysis to identify any differences in perceptions between the CL and non-CL staff groups.

Results

Response rate: 10% (123/1181). Both staff groups identified literature searching as the top core task and agreed on the main CL roles. Perceptions on the necessary personal characteristics were also similar. Ranking differed for a few tasks: non-CL staff may ascribe more importance to some tasks (evidence synthesis, critical appraisal training and attending ward rounds/team meetings) than the CL staff state. CLs spent more time on staff management, and less time on study skills training than non-CL staff perceived.

Discussion

Results indicated that CL roles are continuing to develop, but that CLs are more integrated into library administration than some non-CL staff believe.

Conclusion

Shared perceptions around CL roles should help workforce development.

Adoption of peer review of literature search strategies in knowledge synthesis from 2009 to 2018: An overview

Por Christine J. Neilson

Abstract

Background

Knowledge synthesis (KS) reviews rely on good quality literature searches to capture a complete set of relevant studies, and peer review of the search strategy is one quality control mechanism that contributes to better quality reviews. Guidelines for peer review of electronic search strategies (PRESS) have been available since 2008.

Objectives

This overview provides a snapshot of KS indexed in Scopus, published between 2009 and 2018, that reported peer review of the literature search strategy.

Methods

Articles were identified through citation chasing for PRESS guidance documents and supplementary keyword searches. The characteristics of individual articles and the journals that published them were documented, and descriptive statistics were compiled.

Results

415 articles from 169 journals met inclusion criteria. Approximately half were published in 14 journal titles. Most reviews reported the involvement of an information professional, but PRESS reviewers were rarely acknowledged. An overwhelming majority of review teams were based in Canada.

Discussion

Reported use of PRESS was low during the period examined, but under-reporting may be a factor. Investigation of the barriers and facilitators of PRESS adoption is needed.

Conclusion

Despite its value, adoption of PRESS appears low. Advocacy for, and education about, PRESS may be required.

Mental health clinicians views of summary and systematic review utility in evidence‐based practice

Por Rachel Steele

Abstract

Background

Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires integration of research evidence with clinical expertise and patient preferences. It is endorsed by many regulatory bodies, using the approach is challenging for many busy clinicians.

Objectives

To explore mental health practitioners’ perceptions of the factors which help, and which hinder, EBP and their views of two formats for presenting research findings – a systematic review and a one-page summary of that review. (written by a clinical librarian)

Methods

Qualitative semi-structured interviews with a multi-professional sample of mental health clinicians. (n=7)

Results

Participants worked under varying time constraints, with some participants perceiving a conflict between research activities such as reading the evidence and their clinical duties one-page research summary would help some participienrs to identify potentially valuable evidence quickly. However, participants agreed that they would need to read full systematic review to assess whether and how their practice could or should change.

Discussion

A one-page research summary can perform useful functions for clinicians; however, they require more detailed research reports such as systematic reviews to judge research's external validity.

Conclusion

This exploratory study indicates that writing evidence summaries is a useful role for clinical librarians, as part of training and support for EBP.

Outreach marketing may be a successful strategy for NHS libraries

Por Hayley Clark

Abstract

This dissertation study investigates the ways that NHS libraries are currently marketing their services within their organisation and was submitted as part of the MA Library and Information Management at the University of Sheffield in 2019. This paper presents the findings from twelve semi-structured interviews carried out with NHS library managers in the East of England to identify the most and least successful methods, and in comparison with that which is currently in the general marketing literature. The study found that outreach marketing was the most effective and that librarians are currently conducting marketing to the best of their ability, but they lack time and funding to be able to make the most of their promotional campaigns.

F.J.

Issue Information

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 1, Page i-iv, March 2021.

‘Evidence’ within local authority decision making

Por Michael Cook

Abstract

Michael Cook looks at the role of an embedded Public Health Information Specialist highlighting the ways the core evidence, information and knowledge skills are used to progress Public Health activity in local government settings. Acknowledging the current pandemic, he explores how COVID-19 has dominated all aspects of health and social care, and outlines how evidence services have work within these complex Public Health systems to lead the local response and recovery efforts.

Forthcoming papers

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 1, Page 77-77, March 2021.

Who is blocking access to PubMed? Educational ‘Escape Room’ for medical residents

Por Noelia Álvarez‐Díaz, Eulàlia Grifol‐Clar

Abstract

Teaching students how to conduct bibliographic searches in health sciences’ databases is essential training. One of the challenges librarians face is how to motivate students during classroom learning. In this article, two hospital libraries, in Spain, used Escape rooms as a method of bringing creativity, teamwork, communication and critical thinking into bibliographic search instruction. Escape rooms are a series of puzzles that must be solved to exit the game. This article explores the methods used for integrating escape rooms into training programmes and evaluates the results. Escape Rooms are a useful tool that can be integrated into residents’ training to support their instruction on bibliographic searches. This kind of learning stablishes competences like logical thinking and deductive approaching. These aspects aid participants to make their own decision and to develop social and intellectual skills.

Health information diffusion on Twitter: The content and design of WHO tweets matter

Por Holger Hönings, Daniel Knapp, Bích Châu Nguyễn, Daniel Richter, Kelly Williams, Isabelle Dorsch, Kaja J. Fietkiewicz

Abstract

Background

Micro-blogging services empower health institutions to quickly disseminate health information to many users. By analysing user data, infodemiology (i.e. improving public health using user contributed health related content) can be measured in terms of information diffusion.

Objectives

Tweets by the WHO were examined in order to identify tweet attributes that lead to a high information diffusion rate using Twitter data collected between November 2019 and January 2020.

Methods

One thousand hundred and seventy-seven tweets were collected using Python's Tweepy library. Afterwards, k-means clustering and manual coding were used to classify tweets by theme, sentiment, length and count of emojis, pictures, videos and links. Resulting groups with different characteristics were analysed for significant differences using Mann–Whitney U- and Kruskal–Wallis H-tests.

Results

The topic of the tweet, the included links, emojis and (one) picture as well as the tweet length significantly affected the tweets’ diffusion, whereas sentiment and videos did not show any significant influence on the diffusion of tweets.

Discussion

The findings of this study give insights on why specific health topics might generate less attention and do not showcase sufficient information diffusion.

Conclusion

The subject and appearance of a tweet influence its diffusion, making the design equally essential to the preparation of its content.

A survey of health information source use in rural communities identifies complex health literacy barriers

Por Oluseyi Daniel Obaremi, Wole Michael Olatokun

Abstract

Background

Access to health information is critical for good health. However, residents of rural communities may face more difficulties in accessing health information than residents in rural areas. Problems may be structural, socio-economic and cultural.

Objectives

The study assessed sources and challenges concerning health information access and use among residents of five rural communities in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Methods

Descriptive survey design was adopted, and data were elicited from forty respondents through focus group discussions (FGD). Elicited data were thematically analysed.

Results

Several informal and primary information sources were often used. Residents used the radio to access health information, and they also visited hospitals/health centres, asked doctors, participated in health sensitisation programmes and consulted traditional herbalists. However, the barriers included financial problems, infrastructure problems (bad road network, unreliable electricity supplies), living far from health centres and finding suitable health information in their own language. These are individual and systemic/structural challenges.

Discussion

The focus group participants were aware of the importance of reliable health information sources, but often had to use a mixture of sources. Traditional herbalists were valued sources (more available and affordable). Health literacy problems concern education and language.

Conclusions

Service provision could be improved to make health information more efficient and effective for rural communities, by building on what works (e.g. health sensitisation programmes, radio programmes providing health education) and providing more multi-lingual services. The study also confirmed the importance of evaluating traditional herbal medicine.

Classification of all pharmacological interventions tested in trials relevant to people with schizophrenia: A study‐based analysis

Por Farhad Shokraneh, Clive E. Adams

Abstract

Background

Systematic reviewing is a time-consuming and resource-intensive process. Information specialists are maintaining study-based registers to facilitate efficient conduct of systematic reviews. Classification of study-level meta-data -such as interventions –can result in much more accurate searches, saving time in the early steps of systematic reviewing.

Objective

To classify all pharmacological interventions from all schizophrenia trials.

Methods

We used Cochrane Schizophrenia's Study-based Register as the source of trials, Emtree and MeSH for synonyms, AdisInsight and CT.gov for research drugs and WHO ATC for marketed drugs.

Results

One third of tested interventions on patients with schizophrenia are pharmacological (816; belonging to 106 clinical classes) with antipsychotic drugs being the most researched (15.1%). Only 528 of these medications are listed in WHO ATC. Around one third of these drug interventions are seen only in research (236; from 21 pharmacological/biochemical classes). Within the pharmacological interventions, we identified 28 ‘qualifiers’ including dose, route and timing of drug delivery.

Conclusion

Identification and classification of pharmacological interventions from trials require use of many sources of information none of which are inclusive of all drugs. Limitations of each source are helpful to understand. Classification of non-pharmacological interventions is now a priority for clinical and information scientists and professionals.

Socio‐demographic characteristics affect health information seeking on the Internet in Turkey

Por Şenol Demirci, Özgür Uğurluoğlu, Murat Konca, Cuma Çakmak

ABSTRACT

Objective

The objective of this paper was to determine the effects of certain socio-demographic characteristics of Turkish individuals who seek health information on the Internet.

Methods

This study was granted permission to use data obtained by the Turkish Statistical Institute (TSI) in 2018 under their Household Information Technology Use (HITU) study. The original sample for this research comprised 19,389 participants.

Results

Age, gender, educational level, place of residence and frequency of Internet use were all found to impact the participants’ health information seeking behaviour on the Internet. Health information was sought more frequently by women than men, by younger than older people and by those with higher levels of education. Also, health information searches were conducted more often in developed regions than in less-developed regions. In addition, it was also found that the habit of seeking health information was more common among those who use the Internet more frequently.

Conclusion

Several socio-demographic characteristics of individuals affect their health information seeking behaviour on the Internet. All individuals should be granted equivalent access to reliable health information by taking sociodemographic characteristics and discrepancies into consideration.

Shane Godbolt – A North American perspective

Por Donna Flake, Margaret Haines, Susan Crawford, Jim Henderson, Maria Lopez
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue S1, Page 36-39, December 2020.

Publications, Obituaries & Tributes of Shane Godbolt

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue S1, Page 82-83, December 2020.

Shane Godbolt: Honours and awards

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue S1, Page 84-84, December 2020.

Shane Godbolt 1943–2019

Por Nicky Whitsed, Cheryl Twomey, Richard Osborn, Hélène Gorring (Chair), Beatrice Doran
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue S1, Page 1-2, December 2020.

The international collaborations of Shane Godbolt: EAHIL, ICML and irish health science libraries

Por Beatrice Doran, Derek Law

Abstract

This article summarises Shane Godbolt’s international Collaborations. It includes her associations with the European Association of Health Information & Libraries (EAHIL), International Congress on Medical Librarianship (ICML) and the Irish Health Sciences Libraries (HSLG).

Partnership working in Africa: Shane Godbolt providing the links to the tapestry

Por Chipo Msengezi, Blessing Mawire

Abstract

This paper explores the work that Shane Godbolt did in Africa in strengthening health information networks. It focuses on th role she played in supporting the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) and working with the Information Training Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA) to provide capacity building linkages. Some examples of such linkages extending beyond Africa to the United Kingdom are explored. It then concludes with reflections from authors on their own experiences of working with Shane Godbolt.

Forthcoming Papers

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue 4, Page 350-350, December 2020.

Sport science librarianship = health science librarianship?

Por Lotta Haglund

Abstract

Does sports science librarianship differ from other aspects of health librarianship? Or are sports science librarians more likely to identify as generalist librarians? This editorial introduces the salutogenic approach to sport, factors that support human health and well‐being, and highlights the challenge of resourcing the diversity of subjects covered by sports sciences. Highlighting key parallels with medicine and public health, it concludes by advocating for closer alignment between sports and health science librarianship.

Acknowledgements

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue 4, Page 348-349, December 2020.

It's Great up North: maximising the learning and development opportunities provided by organising and attending a regional event

Por Gil Young, Dominic Gilroy, Katie Nicholas

Abstract

In 2019 Health Education England supported health care library knowledge service staff in the Northern region to organise a two‐day event to share knowledge and expertise, and to develop their networks. The article describes how the event was organised, emphasising the advance planning and development opportunities provided for participants, such as webinars, and randomised coffee trial meetings between participants. Of the 100 participants, 60 delivered a poster, workshop or presentation. Reflective evaluation of the event by the organising committee indicated that networking was actively encouraged, and that a higher proportion of library assistants participated than usual. Concludes that the virtual aspects of the event worked well, and that future events could include a mix of face to face and virtual sessions. D.I.

Corrigendum

Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 37, Issue 4, Page 351-351, December 2020.
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