Noticias em eLiteracias

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✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Preservation storage in a flood damage mitigation effort at the National Library of France

Por Céline Allain — 23 de Setembro de 2021, 04:00
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
During a flood alert, the decision to evacuate a threatened collection of a library is an important one. If not thought out carefully, a hastily executed move can expose valuable collections to unforeseen threats. Although floods are usually slow to develop in Paris, the decision to make a preventive evacuation must be taken at the appropriate moment, considering the time needed for the relocation, the reality of the threat and the need for service continuity. In the context of its flood protection plan, the National Library of France has conceived a box model that contributes to saving time in case of a flood and prevents damage during an evacuation. Combining accessibility to documents with security requirements, this model can be implemented in different contexts.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Applicability of traditional storage methods in Indonesia for today’s conservation practice

Por Patricia Engel — 2 de Setembro de 2021, 09:31
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
This contribution aims to distil the experience from several conservation projects in Java, Indonesia, into a summary of methods in an attempt to arrive at some suggestions for best practice for the preservation of cultural heritage items in a tropical country. The related projects concerned a museum of contemporary art, traditional puppet theatre materials, a museum of traditional art and an archive.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Public libraries’ responses to a global pandemic: Bangladesh perspectives

Por Dilara Begum — 1 de Setembro de 2021, 09:32
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The whole world is experiencing a new reality – the global outbreak of COVID-19, which has forced every institution into lockdown. This study aims to explore the responses of the government public libraries of Bangladesh. An online questionnaire was used to gather primary data from all of the 71 public libraries, which was followed by semi-structured interviews with eight librarians. The analysis suggests that more than 50% of the libraries had a low level of preparedness to face any crisis, and none of the libraries were fully prepared to manage this pandemic. All of the libraries were open for administrative functions without physical access to users. The study found that 52% of the libraries created public awareness through social media, while 46% supported local government organizations and 40% provided counselling services. Considering the existing challenges, the study recommends some measures for the public libraries of Bangladesh to cope with this situation.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Dissemination of information in the COVID-19 era in university libraries in Nigeria

Por Saturday U Omeluzor — 27 de Agosto de 2021, 09:38
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
In Nigeria, the first case of coronavirus (COVID-19) was reported on 27 February 2020 and as at date, there are about 13,000 confirmed cases across Nigeria. The spread of COVID-19 forced the lockdown of libraries. This study investigated the dissemination of information in meeting the information needs of library patrons during the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown of university libraries in Nigeria. Using a descriptive survey design, a sample population of 178 librarians from federal, state and private universities in Nigeria was questioned. The findings show that libraries disseminated information on personal hygiene to their patrons (hand-washing, cleanliness and the use of hand sanitizers) and sensitized the general public to COVID-19 by using posters and flyers. The findings also reveal that libraries disseminated information and links to e-resources to support patrons’ ongoing research. Moreover, It was revealed in the findings that lack of coordination, strike action by the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) and none subscription for data for librarians to work from home were challenges.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Prevalence and source analysis of COVID-19 misinformation in 138 countries

Por Md. Sayeed Al-Zaman — 27 de Agosto de 2021, 09:37
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
This study analysed 9657 pieces of misinformation that originated in 138 countries and were fact-checked by 94 organizations to understand the prevalence and sources of misinformation in different countries. The results show that India (15.94%), the USA (9.74%), Brazil (8.57%) and Spain (8.03%) are the four most misinformation-affected countries. Based on the results, it is presumed that the prevalence of COVID-19 misinformation can have a positive association with the COVID-19 situation. Social media (84.94%) produces the largest amount of misinformation, and the Internet (90.5%) as a whole is responsible for most of the COVID-19 misinformation. Moreover, Facebook alone produces 66.87% of the misinformation among all social media platforms. Of all the countries, India (18.07%) produced the largest amount of social media misinformation, perhaps thanks to the country’s higher Internet penetration rate, increasing social media consumption and users’ lack of Internet literacy.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Advocacy of the Sustainable Development Goals in Jordanian academic libraries

Por Faten Hamad — 27 de Agosto de 2021, 09:37
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
In view of the increased importance of the Sustainable Development Goals and the limited number of public libraries in Jordan, it is important to investigate the role and practices of academic libraries in promoting knowledge and skills to support the Sustainable Development Goals in Jordan. It is also important to explore the challenges that might hinder the accomplishment of the Sustainable Development Goals. The results of this study support the fact that academic libraries can significantly contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals (M = 3.53) by providing access to relevant and up-to-date information (M = 4.16) and giving training on information literacy (M = 4.03). Access to information contributes to the quality of life of society (M = 4.41). This article provides insights for academic librarians and decision-makers into disseminating measures for promoting knowledge and skills related to the Sustainable Development Goals among students and the public community in Jordan. The study recommends some relevant strategies, such as the collaboration of academic libraries with governmental and health institutions to support the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals in Jordan.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Onboarding in the age of COVID-19

Por Andrew R Carlos — 24 de Agosto de 2021, 09:17
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Due to the transition to a remote/virtual working environment, the process of onboarding new hires has to make a shift to the remote/virtual as well. In this article, a review of past and present practices at a mid-sized academic library is conducted, as well as an autoethnographic reflection of a new hire’s experience with onboarding. Best practices and suggestions are presented to help inform other libraries that are also going through a remote/virtual onboarding experience.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

A review of the library and information science profession in the Maldives: Development, challenges and opportunities

Por Gina de Alwis Jayasuriya — 20 de Agosto de 2021, 09:21
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The Republic of Maldives, a small island developing state in the Indian Ocean, has achieved upper-middle-income and high human development category status, and one of the strongest information and communications technology infrastructures in South Asia. However, the country’s library and information science sector, which saw its inception over seven decades ago, has yet to advance beyond the initial development phase. This article traces the emergence of the library and information science sector in the country and draws attention to the myriad challenges faced by it. The article is also an attempt to draw the attention of government decision-makers and motivate them to understand and resolve the difficulties faced by the library and information science sector through engaging library and information science employers, educational institutions, professional trainers, and library and information science professionals. Some concerns are identified and five key action areas with associated action steps are suggested. These may resonate with other small developing countries that are facing similar scenarios.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Expanding digital academic library and archive services at the University of Calgary in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

Por James E Murphy — 11 de Agosto de 2021, 09:56
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Despite the uncertain challenges facing libraries of all types during the COVID-19 pandemic, new best practices and innovative ways of approaching services have emerged. Including the groundbreaking Taylor Family Digital Library in 2011, the University of Calgary Libraries and Cultural Resources has been contributing towards the ongoing development of the digital academic library. The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a rapid leveraging of digital skills, platforms, expertise, and models of service delivery to continue providing exceptional and transformative experiences for the University of Calgary community. The initiatives discussed in this article include online work teams, virtual 360-degree tours, the online library chat service, digital collections agreements, and remote services for archives and special collections.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Curation of manuscripts in the tropical savanna climate of north-eastern India

Por Sudip Bhattacharjee — 10 de Agosto de 2021, 09:35
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The tropical savanna climate of north-eastern India has special features due to the region’s alternative weather and geographical location. There are more than 50,000 rare manuscripts stored in different manuscript preservation centres in this region. The National Mission for Manuscripts has taken many initiatives to preserve these manuscripts, including digitization. However, no significant changes related to the physical condition of the manuscripts have been observed. Most of the manuscripts are deteriorating naturally due to improper care. The process of the deterioration of manuscripts due to the effects of the environment, weather and climate can be minimized by taking appropriate measures. This article discusses the status of the physical condition of the manuscripts in this region along with the effects of climate and weather. It also discusses the need for special care of the manuscripts in this geographical location with simple preventive measures or techniques.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Users’ experiences of reference services in Thai academic libraries

Por Kittiya Suthiprapa — 9 de Agosto de 2021, 08:31
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
This research aimed to analyse the user experiences of reference services in academic libraries based on the marketing mix 7Ps concept. The sample was instructors and students from eight national research universities in Thailand. Questionnaires were returned by 337 instructors (86.41%) and 399 students (100%). The results show that the component of the marketing mix 7Ps that was most important for reference services according to the users was people (β = .881), followed by place (β = .868), promotion (β = .863), product (β = .856), price (β = .854), process (β = .805) and physical environment (β = .789). When considering product, the most important services were counselling, research information seeking, instruction and answering, respectively. The results of this marketing mix 7Ps study reveal users’ attitudes with regard to various aspects that can be integrated with service design and create a model for developing library service innovation.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Editorial

Por Stephen Stratton — 4 de Agosto de 2021, 09:17
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

A model of access to information among Nigerian rice farmers

Por Ugonna Benedette Fidelugwuowo — 4 de Agosto de 2021, 09:13
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Facilitating access to information has been and will continue to be a dynamic process in light of the growing importance of information. Many studies have explored the socio-economic characteristics or attributes of farmers that affect access to information. Studies on models for their prediction are often lagged, particularly in developing countries. In this article, data on access to information and other attributes was collected from 1920 randomly selected rice farmers in Nigeria using structured interviews. Half of the farmers (49.0%) had access to information on rice farming and more than half (64.9%) belonged to a farmers group. The majority of the rice farmers were married (90.7%) and educated (73.1%). A logistic regression model with a 54.4% correct prediction showed age, education and membership of a farmers group to be predictors of access to information. Librarians should ascertain the attributes of rice farmers to enable them to repackage information for easy access.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

COVID-19 information seeking and utilization among library and information science professionals in Nigeria

Por Esharenana E Adomi — 4 de Agosto de 2021, 09:13
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Like many countries, Nigeria’s library services were affected by COVID-19. This study (conducted in 2020) examined the priorities and barriers for information seeking and use by library and information science professionals in Nigeria, including what type of information was sought, the sources used and how these were evaluated. An online survey, with questions informed by a literature survey, was sent to library and information science professionals in Nigeria with WhatsApp accounts (individual and library and information science group accounts). The responses were automatically collected and saved into Google Sheets for further analysis using descriptive statistics. There were 167 responses (61% response rate). The main information needs were causes of the virus, COVID-19 symptoms, providing library services during physical library closure, the timing of reopening, and staff and user safety measures required for library reopening. The respondents were also concerned about COVID-19 test procedures and transmission mechanisms, treatment (including herbal medicines), vaccines, government policy and restrictions on movement. The main information sources used were the Internet (including government and World Health Organization websites), social media, television and radio. The authority, reliability, currency and relevance of the information were considered when evaluating COVID-19 information consulted, and were using the information primarily to ‘keep safe’ in accordance with government regulations, to provide library services on time and to plan for safe reopening. The barriers to information seeking and use were technical (poor telecommunications), financial (lack of funds to purchase resources) and physical (library closures). One barrier was the volume of information (both reliable and unreliable). Verification was viewed as important but seemingly difficult to do. The respondents were concerned about the safe and effective operation of library services. Library and information science professionals in Nigeria may need advice from health professionals on the most reliable sources of information on COVID-19 and how to use them for themselves and their users.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Developing future-ready school libraries through design thinking: A case study

Por Chin Ee Loh — 4 de Agosto de 2021, 09:12
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
School libraries around the world need to revitalise their spaces, collections and programming to continue to be relevant for teachers and students living and learning in an information-saturated technological global age. Efforts in the rethinking of library usage and design are most effective when they are contextualised and localised, based on user needs and country or school budgets. Design thinking is a useful approach for schools to understand the needs of their populations and design targeted improvements for their libraries’ specific users. This article explains how one secondary school collaborated with university researchers to use design thinking to re-envision the role and functions of its school library. The evidence collected through the process was integrated into the redesign of an improved library for the students. This article provides a model for evidence-driven school library improvement projects.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Intellectual property information services and the impacts on academic libraries’ transformation from the perspective of Chinese university libraries

Por Wei Yang — 3 de Agosto de 2021, 09:22
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Approximately 100 Intellectual Property Information Services Centres have been established in Chinese university libraries, more than 80% of them since 2017. The context of this boom in Intellectual Property Information Services Centres is the rapidly increasing number of patent applications in China, as well as an unacceptably low transfer ratio. Do Intellectual Property Information Services Centres represent a promising direction for university library transformation? This is the central issue addressed in this article. The characteristics of the Chinese evolutionary path and driving forces are discussed, and distinctive intellectual property information service practices are studied and summarized. Comparisons are made with the USA, the UK, Europe and India. With Intellectual Property Information Services Centres, university libraries can evolve from information providers to innovation catalysts, and establish closer connections between universities, communities and industries. The impacts of Intellectual Property Information Services Centres on university librarianship are multifaceted. The trends and challenges of intellectual property information services are also discussed in the article.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Enabling cultural heritage spaces in Nigerian public libraries: A case study of the Anambra State Library Board

Por Ngozi Perpetua Osuchukwu — 22 de Julho de 2021, 09:53
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Nigerian public libraries play important roles in enabling the collation and sustainability of communities’ indigenous knowledge. This article is a case study of the activities, services and challenges of sustaining cultural heritage in the Anambra State Library Board. The study involved qualitative research, with physical visits, observation techniques and interviews for data collection. The researchers found that the public library has a cultural heritage section with various indigenous items displayed with their local names. The staff are involved in several activities designed to create effective cultural services. The Library Board organizes an annual cultural festival and talk shows, traditional dance, indigenous skills acquisition, storytelling, Igbo language readingand spelling bee. These programmes are developed in consultation and collaboration with community members, the media and the Nigerian Library Association. The challenges include problems of collation, damage, conservation and preservation. It is recommended that Nigerian public libraries should acquire more indigenous resources and conserve local items in digital collections.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Dunhuang scrolls: Innovative storage solutions at the British Library

Por Paulina Kralka — 21 de Julho de 2021, 09:49
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The British Library’s Stein collection contains about 14,000 scrolls, fragments and booklets in Chinese from a cave in the Buddhist Mogao Caves complex near Dunhuang in north-west China. This article describes storage and access solutions for the collection in the context of a busy research library and the currently ongoing Lotus Sutra Manuscripts Digitisation project. The article presents the various technical and organisational challenges that its rehousing presents to the library conservators. Restricted by the existing storage facilities, budget limitations and tight project deadlines, the conservators must provide housing that is adequate for the scroll format, is practical and prevents dissociation, but is also cost- and time-effective. With the best storage practice in mind, they have developed original solutions, balancing the specific housing requirements and constraints. These storage solutions allow the conservators to ensure the long-term safety and accessibility of the collection while laying down a foundation of standardisation that will ensure a homogeneity of approaches for future projects.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Searching for tūpuna

Por Nicola Andrews — 15 de Julho de 2021, 09:45
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture opened the “Pacific Voices” exhibition in 1997, a community-led exhibition of Indigenous cultures throughout the Pacific Rim, including Māori. Twenty years later, Nicola Andrews, a Ngāti Pāoa Māori student at the University of Washington, serendipitously visited the Burke and began collaborating with the museum to reframe taonga (treasure, anything prized) descriptions in its catalogue and physical spaces. The Burke collection also includes 962 Māori photographs spanning the 19th century, which were removed from Aotearoa New Zealand and donated to the museum in 1953. These photographs had been digitized but not published, and the museum had almost no identifying information about their subjects. This article describes what is perhaps the first attempt in over six decades to identify the rangatira (chief, person of high rank) depicted in these images, and ways for the Burke to honor the tūpuna (ancestors) and taonga in its care as it prepared to open a new location in late 2019.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Continuity during COVID: Critical digital pedagogy and special collections virtual instruction

Por Amanda Boczar — 13 de Julho de 2021, 09:34
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
When the world began to take notice of the growing risks of COVID-19 in early spring 2020, the University of South Florida Libraries–Tampa Special Collections shifted to virtual instruction sessions to provide students with access to rare books and primary-source archival materials. To respond to the need for a quick shift to online instruction, the department formulated a plan to support students with an open-access digital learning experience using ArcGIS StoryMaps. Building on critical digital pedagogy and feminist digital humanities, the sessions provided online teaching resources for faculty who could not schedule students for physical visits. Over the first year of remote work, the department created sessions for 15 course sections. Looking to the future, Special Collections will continue providing the option of virtual sessions as part of its instruction. The digital nature of the courses lends to a recursive pedagogy, allowing for continued adaptation that is complimentary to academic cycles.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Management of e-resources in academic libraries in Ghana: Copyright implications

Por Theresa L Adu — 9 de Julho de 2021, 09:45
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
This study investigated the copyright issues surrounding the management of e-resources in academic libraries in Ghana. Forty-seven library staff and head librarians from four academic libraries were engaged using questionnaires and qualitative interviews in a sequential mixed-methods approach to generate data for this study. The findings indicate that in all four institutions copyright issues arose with the provision of distance learning, online courses and e-reserves services. All the respondents stated that they or their colleagues had had faculty ask questions on copyright issues. However, the professional librarians indicated that the library was not consulted and the instructors for online courses or distance education programmes did not cooperate with librarians; rather, the department posting the materials made the decisions on copyright regarding the usage of digital resources for distance learning, online courses or e-reserves. This does not augur well for the management of copyright of e-resources in academic libraries in Ghana.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

How older adults in the USA and India seek information during the COVID-19 pandemic: A comparative study of information behavior

Por Brady D Lund — 9 de Julho de 2021, 09:32
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic introduced significant information challenges for older adults worldwide. Given the widespread disparities in information infrastructure and access between developing and developed countries, the challenges presented during this period may be even more grave in the developing world. This interview study examines how older adults (age 65+) in two countries—the USA and India—experienced information needs, sources, and barriers. The results indicate distinct experiences among the two populations, with individuals in the USA expressing more diverse needs, while Indian respondents focused on the impact of COVID-19. The American respondents also indicated much greater use of Internet resources compared to the Indian respondents, who used television and print resources more frequently. Far more Indian respondents reported significant challenges finding information to satisfy their information needs. The findings of this study have important ramifications for the design of intervention, education, and support for the information-related needs of older adults worldwide.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Remembering COVID-19; or, a duty to document the coronavirus pandemic

Por Marc Kosciejew — 8 de Julho de 2021, 09:45
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
Remembering the coronavirus pandemic represents an obligation to the present and the future. Illuminating the intersections between remembrance, documentary heritage, memory institutions and COVID-19, this article argues that libraries, archives and museums have a unique and urgent duty to document the coronavirus pandemic as it unfolds to help ensure that its associated recorded heritage is collected, preserved and archived for the present and future purposes of consultation, reference and remembrance. Explicit ‘duty to document the coronavirus pandemic’ policy provisions should be adopted by libraries, archives and museums to, first, strengthen their current COVID-19 documentary initiatives and, second, support other possible documentary initiatives related to this or future global health crises. By documenting COVID-19, it can be collectively remembered and future possible health crises can be better anticipated.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Cooking up engagement during a pandemic: The international Great Rare Books Bake Off between the Penn State and Monash University Libraries

Por Christina Riehman-Murphy — 6 de Julho de 2021, 09:50
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
In July 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Monash University Library in Melbourne, Australia, and the Penn State University Libraries in Pennsylvania, USA, leveraged their previously established international sister-library partnership to host a virtual engagement event focused on promoting the partnership and selected special collections at both institutions. The Monash–Penn State Great Rare Books Bake Off, a friendly competition collaboratively developed by the two academic libraries, engaged both institutions’ communities with their collections and resources by inviting participants to bake featured recipes from their collections and post evidence of their experiences on social media platforms. In addition to promoting awareness of the institutions’ international partnership and their respective collections, a primary goal of the collaborative project was to offer their local communities an enjoyable and creative outlet during a difficult time. This illustrative case study describes how the two institutions planned, executed, and assessed the project.
✇ IFLA Journal: Table of Contents

Communication channels for exchanging agricultural information among Tanzanian farmers: A meta-analysis

Por Wulystan Pius Mtega — 6 de Julho de 2021, 03:03
IFLA Journal, Ahead of Print.
This study investigates how communication channels to exchange agricultural information were chosen. Specifically, it identifies the communication channels used by farmers in Tanzania and determines the factors influencing the choice of communication channels for exchanging agricultural information. The study employs a meta-analysis review methodology in identifying, evaluating and interpreting studies relevant to the topic of interest. The results indicate that radio, mobile phones, television, fellow farmers, agricultural extension agents and newspapers were the commonly used communication channels for transferring agricultural information. Moreover, the channels’ influence, availability, affordability, communication network coverage, and the resources and facilities needed to use a particular communication channel were found to influence the choice of channels. It is concluded that understanding the audience, the characteristics surrounding messages and choosing appropriate communication channels are important for enhancing access to agricultural information. It is recommended that agricultural information providers should understand the factors surrounding communication channels before disseminating agricultural information.
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