Noticias em eLiteracias

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✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Forthcoming Papers

20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 4, Page 329-329, December 2021.
✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

The visual abstract: A social media fad or the future of dissemination

Por Angela Castellanos, Charlie M. Wray — 20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34

Abstract

This editorial discusses the emergence of visual abstracts within journals to disseminate findings. Published alongside Aggarwal's retrospective study reporting that visual abstracts do not increase impact scores more than conventional abstracts of clinical research, it is suggested that visual abstracts may have a greater impact for smaller, specialty journals.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Issue Information

20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 4, Page i-iv, December 2021.
✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Acknowledgement

20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 4, Page 330-331, December 2021.
✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Literature searching methods or guidance and their application to public health topics: A narrative review

Por Andrea Heath, Paul Levay, Daniel Tuvey — 1 de Dezembro de 2021, 09:42

Abstract

Background

Information specialists conducting searches for systematic reviews need to consider key questions around which and how many sources to search. This is particularly important for public health topics where evidence may be found in diverse sources.

Objectives

The objective of this review is to give an overview of recent studies on information retrieval guidance and methods that could be applied to public health evidence and used to guide future searches.

Methods

A literature search was performed in core databases and supplemented by browsing health information journals and citation searching. Results were sifted and reviewed.

Results

Seventy-two papers were found and grouped into themes covering sources and search techniques. Public health topics were poorly covered in this literature.

Discussion

Many researchers follow the recommendations to search multiple databases. The review topic influences decisions about sources. Additional sources covering grey literature eliminate bias but are time-consuming and difficult to search systematically. Public health searching is complex, often requiring searches in multidisciplinary sources and using additional methods.

Conclusions

Search planning is advisable to enable decisions about which and how many sources to search. This could improve with more work on modelling search scenarios, particularly in public health topics, to examine where publications were found and guide future research.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Using an artificial intelligence tool can be as accurate as human assessors in level one screening for a systematic review

Por Joseph K. Burns, Cole Etherington, Olivia Cheng‐Boivin, Sylvain Boet — 18 de Novembro de 2021, 11:21

Abstract

Background

Artificial intelligence (AI) offers a promising solution to expedite various phases of the systematic review process such as screening.

Objective

We aimed to assess the accuracy of an AI tool in identifying eligible references for a systematic review compared to identification by human assessors.

Methods

For the case study (a systematic review of knowledge translation interventions), we used a diagnostic accuracy design and independently assessed for eligibility a set of articles (n = 300) using human raters and the AI system DistillerAI (Evidence Partners, Ottawa, Canada). We analysed a series of 64 possible confidence levels for the AI’s decisions and calculated several standard parameters of diagnostic accuracy for each.

Results

When set to a lower AI confidence threshold of 0.1 or greater and an upper threshold of 0.9 or lower, DistillerAI made article selection decisions very similarly to human assessors. Within this range, DistillerAI made a decision on the majority of articles (93–100%), with a sensitivity of 1.0 and specificity ranging from 0.9 to 1.0.

Conclusion

DistillerAI appears to be accurate in its assessment of articles in a case study of 300 articles. Further experimentation with DistillerAI will establish its performance among other subject areas.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Embedded librarians: An innovative experience in health and wellness communication

Por Annarita Barbaro, Sofia Enrica Amicarella, Paola Ferrari, Ilaria Sorcini, Monica Zedda — 18 de Novembro de 2021, 11:11

Abstract

The article discusses the experiences of Italian librarians taking part in an institutional project to produce a new general-public-oriented health web portal. The web portal was set up to provide verified and easily understandable health information, and to debunk health-related fake news circulating on the internet. The different roles, knowledge and skills acquired in during the project this are discussed and show how the librarian’s knowledge and skills were of fundamental importance for the success of the Web Portal. By collaborating with other professions new skills such as social media management, video creation and Search Engine Optimization were gained, which enhanced the information literacy role of the service.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Library research support services in China’s universities of traditional medicine: Understanding user requirements

Por Yihang Chen, Lihong Zhou — 20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34

Abstract

In this article, Ms Yihang Chen with her supervisor, Prof Lihong Zhou, reports on her MA in Library Science study aimed to identify user requirements of library research support services (RSS) at the universities of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in China. This study adopted an inductive qualitative approach, employed as a case study and 14 TCM researchers and academic librarians using semi-structured interviews. The research findings point to 28 RSS requirements in five main themes: mastering, planning, project, publication and electronic preservation stages. Although this research is situated in China, it has implications for libraries worldwide in supporting research into holistic and indigenous medicine. F.J.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

An alternative screening approach for Google Search identifies an accurate and manageable number of results for a systematic review (case study)

Por Simon Briscoe, Morwenna Rogers — 4 de Novembro de 2021, 07:00

Abstract

Background

A challenge when using Google Search to identify studies for a systematic review is managing the high number of results, which can number in the hundreds of thousands or even more. Studies and guidance on web searching suggest limiting the screening process, e.g. to the first 100 results.

Objectives

Our objective in this case study is to demonstrate an alternative approach to screening the results retrieved by Google Search which is based on our experience that the viewable number of results is often far fewer than the estimated number calculated by the search engine.

Methods

We screened the results of three searches of Google Search using our approach, which involves increasing the number of results displayed per page from 10 to the maximum of 100. We then calculated the viewable number of results and compared this with the estimated number.

Results

The mean of the estimated number of results for the three searches was 569,454,000. The mean of the viewable number results was 463 (0.00008% of the mean of the estimated number of results).

Conclusion

Our findings challenge the commonly reported view that the number of results retrieved when using Google Search is too high to screen in full.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Global trends health science libraries: Part 1

Por Jeannette Murphy — 20 de Dezembro de 2021, 04:34

Abstract

This is the first of three articles based on articles published in the Health Information and Libraries Journal's Regular Feature (International Perspectives and Initiatives). Key trends from 12 countries in Europe, North America, Africa and Asia were identified. In this issue, two trends are described: emergence of new roles and challenges for library staff; supporting researchers engaging in research data management and maintaining institutional repositories. Readers are challenged to compare these trends with their own experiences.J.M.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Health literacy predicts Covid‐19 awareness and protective behaviours of university students

Por Muhammad Asif Naveed, Rozeen Shaukat — 1 de Outubro de 2021, 08:50

Abstract

Background

Health literacy is expected to help individuals deal with the required infection control and knowledge to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Objectives

This study examined the impact of health literacy on Covid-19 awareness and protective behaviours of university students in Pakistan.

Methods

An online questionnaire was used to collect data from students at three universities in Punjab. The approved questionnaire contained 12 statements related to HL, 21 items towards Covid-19 awareness, and 11 statements related to protective behaviours, along with some demographic data. Data analysis used Pearson correlation and simple linear regression.

Results

Health literacy of university students positively predicted their Covid-19 awareness and protective behaviours indicating that students with high health literacy were likely to be more aware of Covid-19 and adopt health protective behaviours. There were gender and rural/urban differences.

Conclusions

The results demonstrated an urgent need for planning a needs-based health literacy programme focusing specifically on Covid-19 literacy in Pakistan. This research might help policy-makers, NGOs, and health librarians devise suitable programme.

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Search Club: Using peer support to develop search skills and share knowledge in a specialist NHS team

Por Katie Nicholas, Emily Hopkins, Liz Jordan, Jo McCrossan, Matt Hunt, Katy Greenfield — 1 de Outubro de 2021, 08:17

Abstract

The newly-formed Knowledge Management team at Health Education England (HEE) established an internal “Search Club” for their Knowledge Specialists to share good practice, exchange ideas, and discuss approaches to developing search strategies. The article describes how this was initiated and run online. The sessions improved the Knowledge Management team skills, and gave them an opportunity to share and learn from each other. A further benefit has been the creation of resources such as a “synonyms bank”, search strategies, and a bank of grey literature sources. These reduce duplication of effort, save time, and improve consistency across the team's output. D.I.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Roy Tabor 1929–2021: The first NHS Regional Librarian in England

Por David Stewart — 22 de Setembro de 2021, 03:54
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 242-243, September 2021.
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Issue Information

22 de Setembro de 2021, 03:54
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page i-iv, September 2021.
✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

10,000 steps a day? Activity trackers, health information literacy and the potential role of Information Science & Health Libraries

Por Aylin Imeri — 22 de Setembro de 2021, 03:54

Abstract

Acknowledging the new ways in which activity tracking technologies (ATTs) such as Apple Watch, Fitbit and Garmin are changing the ways in which we understand human-information interactions, Aylin Imeri calls for information science and health libraries to extend their health information literacy remit to support ATT user information needs.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Forthcoming Papers

22 de Setembro de 2021, 03:54
Health Information & Libraries Journal, Volume 38, Issue 3, Page 244-244, September 2021.
✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Algorithmic literacy in medical students – results of a knowledge test conducted in Germany

Por Philipp Kampa, Felix Balzer — 22 de Setembro de 2021, 03:54

Abstract

The impact of algorithms on everyday life is ever increasing. Medicine and public health are not excluded from this development – algorithms in medicine do not only challenge, change and inform research (methods) but also clinical situations. Given this development, questions arise concerning the competency level of prospective physicians, thus medical students, on algorithm related topics. This paper, based on a master's thesis in library and information science written at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, gives an insight into this topic by presenting and analysing the results of a knowledge test conducted among medical students in Germany. F. J.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Google is goodish: An information literacy course designed to teach users why google may not always be the best place to search for evidence

Por Patricia Lacey — 20 de Setembro de 2021, 15:58

Abstract

This article describes a course that was developed in response to health sector and local authority workers being reliant on Google and using it for their information needs regardless of whether it was the best place to search. The methodology for developing and structuring the course is explored, including details of the content included. The author concludes by asserting that teaching users about the effective use of Google is an important part of user education. D.I.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

A survey of medical researchers indicates poor awareness of research data management processes and a role for data librarians

Por Agnieszka Milewska, Natalia Wiśniewska, Paulina Cimoszko, Jakub Rusakow — 17 de Setembro de 2021, 05:24

Abstract

Background

The European Parliament's directive on open data indicates the direction to follow for all public institutions in Europe. The portal Polish Platform of Medical Research (PPM) required more information about researcher attitudes and training requirements for strategic planning.

Objectives

The aim was to assess (1) the status of knowledge about research data management among medical researchers in Poland, and (2) their attitudes towards data sharing. This knowledge may help to inform a training program and adapt PPM to the requirements of researchers.

Methods

The authors circulated an online survey and received responses from 603 researchers representing medical sciences and related disciplines. The survey was conducted in 2019 at seven Polish medical universities and at the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine. Analysis used descriptive statistics.

Results

Data sharing was not widespread (55.7% only shared with their research team, 9.8% had shared data on an open access basis). Many cited possible benefits of research data sharing but were concerned about drawbacks (e.g. fraud, plagiarism).

Discussion

Polish medical scientists, like many researchers, are not aware of the processes required for safe data preparation for sharing. Academic libraries should develop roles for data librarians to help train researchers.

Conclusion

Fears about the dangers of data sharing need to be overcome before researchers are willing to share their own research data.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

COVID‐19 information seeking needs and behaviour among citizens in Isfahan, Iran: A qualitative study

Por Mohammad Reza Soleymani, Maedeh Esmaeilzadeh, Faezeh Taghipour, Hasan Ashrafi‐rizi — 7 de Setembro de 2021, 06:20

Abstract

Background

Access to reliable and credible health information improves individuals’ personal care level in crises, such as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. It subsequently results in enhancing the community's health and reducing the health system's costs.

Objectives

This study aimed to investigate the COVID-19 related information seeking behaviour demonstrated by citizens in Isfahan, Iran.

Methods

This research was conducted in 2020 and employed a qualitative approach using conventional content analysis. The research population was selected from almost different social classes of people in Iran using purposive sampling. The saturation point was reached at 24 semi-structured interviews. The data's soundness was confirmed based on the criteria of credibility, confirmability, dependability and transferability proposed by Guba and Lincoln.

Results

The findings revealed five subcategories and 25 codes within the information seeking behaviour. The subcategories included attitude towards the COVID-19 crisis, information needs, information resources, information validation and information seeking barriers.

Conclusion

People seek information from various resources to update their knowledge and become more prepared in the face of COVID-19. The findings can be used to develop policies on informing and preventing the dissemination of false information in crises, such as the COVID-19 crisis.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

UK survey demonstrates a wide range of impacts attributable to clinical librarian services

Por Pip Divall, Cathryn James, Michael Heaton, Alison Brettle — 23 de Agosto de 2021, 14:49

Abstract

Objective

To understand the impact of the UK Clinical Librarian (CL) workforce and benchmark the results against a study undertaken in the North West region of the English National Health Service (NHS).

Methods

An online survey was distributed by CLs to their service users regarding literature searches that had been carried out on their behalf in the 6 months from April to October 2017. Interviews were later carried out in person with selected respondents to the questionnaires.

Results

CLs across the UK contribute to a wide range of outcomes, with 41% of search requests contributing to the choice of intervention, and 41% also to the advice offered by the clinician requester to a patient or their carer. These results are in line with the previous work undertaken in the North West.

Discussion

CLs provide diverse services to clinical teams. They support the continuing professional development and personal research needs of team members, service development needs of organisations, and the information provided contributes to improved quality and safety of patient care.

Conclusion

The survey confirms the findings of the earlier NW study. It demonstrates the impact of services based around literature searching on patient care.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

New nurses apply only basic source evaluation criteria but realize their skills are lacking: More sophisticated approaches to teaching evaluation skills are required

Por Nena Schvaneveldt, Anne R. Diekema, Elizabeth (Betsy) S. Hopkins, Brandon Patterson — 23 de Agosto de 2021, 14:14

Abstract

Background

While information evaluation is an essential component of evidence based practice, it remains unclear how nurses perceive their own source evaluation skills and what evaluation criteria they typically apply.

Objectives

This study aims to determine nurses’ self-reported confidence in their evaluation skills and their actual source evaluation ability. The findings will guide information literacy instruction.

Methods

A questionnaire asked recently graduated nurses from four institutions in the Intermountain West (USA) to rate their confidence in evaluating information and to provide examples of evaluation criteria they typically applied. The quality of these criteria was rated by nursing librarians, then compared with reported confidence in evaluation, years employed as a nurse and highest degree level.

Results

While nurses’ self-reported confidence levels about source evaluation largely matched their ability, their evaluation criteria showed a low level of sophistication and did not match the recommended criteria by professional organizations. Graduate education, not years of work experience, was predictive of the quality of criteria used by nurses, suggesting the importance of more instruction on source evaluation for nursing students.

Conclusions

Nursing educators, including librarians, need to teach evaluation skills at the undergraduate level. Further investigation into building evaluation skills in nurses is warranted.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Translated search strategies may require truncated subject headings for efficient public health retrieval

Por Amy Finnegan, Paul Levay — 19 de Agosto de 2021, 07:08

Abstract

Background

Small databases, such as Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC) and Social Policy and Practice (SPP), can add value to systematic searches. Search strategies designed for large databases may not be appropriate in small sources. A different approach to translating strategies could ensure that small databases are searched efficiently.

Objectives

To establish the contribution HMIC and SPP made to public health guidelines (PHGs); and to recommend an efficient method of translating search strategies.

Methods

Eight PHGs were analysed to establish how many included publications were retrieved from HMIC and SPP. Six options for translating strategies from MEDLINE, using variations of free text and subject terms, were compared.

Results

Health Management Information Consortium contributed 15 and SPP eight of the 483 publications cited in the PHGs. The free-text only search was the one option to miss an included publication. The heading word (with truncation) option was more precise than applying subject headings.

Discussion

There is a risk of missing relevant publications in free-text only searches and it is preferable to include subject terms efficiently.

Conclusion

The heading word (with truncation) option did not miss the evidence included in the PHGs and was the most efficient method for translating MEDLINE to HMIC and SPP.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Development of a validated search filter for Ovid Embase for degenerative cervical myelopathy

Por Maaz A. Khan, Oliver D. Mowforth, Isla Kuhn, Mark R. N. Kotter, Benjamin M. Davies — 19 de Agosto de 2021, 07:00

Abstract

Background

Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is a recently proposed umbrella term for symptomatic cervical spinal cord compression secondary to degeneration of the spine. Currently literature searching for DCM is challenged by the inconsistent uptake of the term ‘DCM’ with many overlapping keywords and numerous synonyms.

Objectives

Here, we adapt our previous Ovid medline search filter for the Ovid embase database, to support comprehensive literature searching. Both embase and medline are recommended as a minimum for systematic reviews.

Methods

References contained within embase identified in our prior study formed a ‘development gold standard’ reference database (N = 220). The search filter was adapted for embase and checked against the reference database. The filter was then validated against the ‘validation gold standard’.

Results

A direct translation was not possible, as medline indexing for DCM and the keywords search field were not available in embase. We also used the ‘focus’ function to improve precision. The resulting search filter has 100% sensitivity in testing.

Discussion and Conclusion

We have developed a validated search filter capable of retrieving DCM references in embase with high sensitivity. In the absence of consistent terminology and indexing, this will support more efficient and robust evidence synthesis in the field.

✇ Health Information & Libraries Journal

Increasing participation by National Health Service knowledge and library services staff in patient and public information: The role of Knowledge for Healthcare, 2014–2019

Por Ruth Carlyle, Louise Goswami, Sue Robertson — 31 de Julho de 2021, 07:00

Abstract

Background

The strategy lead for the National Health Service (NHS) knowledge and library services withn the NHS in England is held by Health Education England, working with 184 local NHS libraries based predominantly in hospitals

Objectives

As part of the strategic framework Knowkedge for Healthcare, the objective was to increase the role NHS knowledge and library services staff play in both indirect an direct support for evidence-based information for patients and the public.

Methods

The study took an integrated multi-level approach: encouraging local staff to share their expertise through Task and Finish groups, developing tools, offering training and reviewing levers available through Health Education England's quality assurance role.

Results

Between 2014 and 2019, the percentage of services supporting patient and public information increased from 27% to 78%. Qualitative evidence demonstrates a wide range of roles played by local services, working either indirectly or directly to ensure access to evidence-based health information for patients and the public.

Discussion

The study shows the benefits of engaging people with local expertise in developing the skills and resources for system-wide change.

Conclusion

Similar system-wide change programmes should also consider an integrated approach, involving people, developing tools, offering training and drawing on incentive structures such as quality assurance measures. Apologies for previous errors to Background, Objectives, Methods

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